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WHY JOIN?

  • Annual Conference
  • Priority Access to The Law Clerks' Review
  • Discounted Rates on CLE programs
  • Ontario Lawyer’s Phone Book Listing
  • Ontario Legal Directory Listing
  • 30% Savings on Group Insurance
  • Falls Avenue Resort Preferred Partner Program
  • And More
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Resources

Membership FAQs

Membership FAQs

  • What is a Law Clerk?

    In Ontario, a Law Clerk is a person, qualified through education, training or work experience, who is employed or retained by a lawyer, law office, governmental agency, or other entity in a capacity or function which involves the performance, under the ultimate direction and guidance of a lawyer, of duties of an administrative or managerial nature, and/or of specifically-delegated substantive legal work, which requires sufficient knowledge of legal concepts that, in the absence of a law clerk, the lawyer would perform.

  • What is The Institute of Law Clerks of Ontario ("ILCO") and what does it do?

    We are a professional association providing continuing education, fellowship and networking for its members. ILCO was incorporated in May 1968 for the purpose of providing an organized network for the promotion of unity, cooperation and mutual assistance among Law Clerks in Ontario. ILCO strives to advance and protect the status and interests of the profession. In addition, it is the mandate of ILCO to provide and promote general and legal education to its members for the purpose of increasing their knowledge, efficiency and professional ability.

    The Law Society of Upper Canada established the name "Law Clerk" and permitted use of this title to members of ILCO in 1968.

  • Why should I become a member?

    ILCO provides the opportunity to network with colleagues and a forum for discussing areas of mutual interest in the legal field.

    ILCO, in cooperation with members of the legal profession, offers courses aimed at educating Law Clerks, which are available at a number of community colleges throughout the province.

    Continuing education is provided through seminars and workshops covering a wide range of topics.  These inform the membership of developments in the law and professional practice.

    The Law Clerks’ Review, is published quarterly, to keep members apprised of amendments to legislation, administrative changes, job opportunities and upcoming events sponsored by The Institute of Law Clerks of Ontario. ILCO also hosts an annual conference for law clerks from across the province and country. This annual conference is a tremendous opportunity for law clerks to meet, network and continue educating themselves.

    Members receive discounted fees for CLE seminars/workshops, fellowship courses and our Annual Conference. ILCO members (Ordinary, Associate, Fellowship) are listed in the Ontario Lawyer's Phone Book and the Ontario Legal Directory. Additional affiliate benefits and discounts are also available.

  • What is the difference between a Law Clerk and a Paralegal?

    A law clerk works under the supervision and direction of a lawyer and a paralegal works for the public on matters permitted by The Law Society of Upper Canada. A law clerk is covered under the lawyer’s insurance; a paralegal is required to carry professional liability insurance. Law clerks are free to work in any area under the supervision of a lawyer. Permitted areas of practice for paralegals are Small Claims Court, Ontario Court of Justice under the Provincial Offences Act, on summary conviction offences where the maximum penalty does not exceed six months’ imprisonment and before administrative tribunals, including the Financial Services Commission of Ontario. Paralegals are permitted to give legal advice concerning legal matters, rights or responsibilities with respect to a proceeding or the subject matter of a proceeding, draft or assist with drafting documents for use in a proceeding. Paralegals are not permitted to appear in Family Court.

    Other than under the supervision of a lawyer, paralegals may not provide legal services that only a lawyer may provide, such as drafting wills or handling real estate transactions or estates. Paralegals are governed by the Law Society of Upper Canada; please visit www.lsuc.on.ca for further information regarding paralegals.